Tropical Agreement

In October 2018, there are 74 ITTA3 parties. Nigeria and Paraguay signed the agreement but did not ratify it. Canada ratified the agreement in 2009, but has since denounced it. ITTA3 (2006) aims to “promote the expansion and diversification of international trade in tropical timber from sustainably managed and legally harvested forests and to promote sustainable management of tropical timber-producing forests.” [1] It came into effect on December 7, 2011. [2] ITTA2 (1994) was developed to ensure that tropical timber exports came from sustainably managed sources until 2000 and to create a fund to help tropical timber producers conserve the resources needed to achieve this goal. The mandate of the International Tropical Timber Organization has also been defined. The agreement was opened for signature on 26 January 1994 and came into force on 1 January 1997. The 1983 International Tropical Timber Agreement (ITTA) is an agreement that provides an effective framework for cooperation between tropical timber producers and consumers and promotes the development of national policies for the sustainable use and conservation of tropical forests and their genetic resources. The International Tropical Timber Organization was created as part of this agreement, which was first opened for signature on November 18, 1983, and entered into force on April 1, 1985. In 1994 (ITTA2) and 2006 (ITTA3), other contracts were concluded with an increasing number of signatories. Fifty-eight parties signed the 1983 agreement: Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bolivia, Brazil, Burma, Cameroon, Canada, People`s Republic of China, Colombia, Democratic Republic of Congo, Republic of Congo, Ivory Coast, Denmark, Ecuador, Egypt, European Union, Fiji, Finland, France, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Guyana, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Ireland, Italy, Japan, South Korea, Liberia, Luxembourg, Malaysia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Panama, Papua New Guinea , Portugal, Russia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Thailand, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, United Kingdom, United States, Venezuela.

This article contains public domain material from the CIA World Factbook: “2003 edition.”

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